cerrar Actualice su navegador
El navegador que está usando en este momento se encuentra desfasado y no cumple los estándares actuales para páginas web. Si quiere disfrutar una versión actualizada de este y otros sitios web, recomendamos que lo actualice gratuitamente a través de uno de estos enlaces:
Internet Explorer 9 Mozilla Firefox Google Chrome
Health / Salud Volver a "Health / Salud"

Simple test could predict high risk prostate cancer

by Elizabeth A. Allen | 05 de febrero de 2012

A study shows a urine test might effectively predict high-risk prostate cancer among men who choose ‘watchful waiting.’ Initial results of the multicenter study involving The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio (UTHSCSA) indicate the presence of two urine-based biomarkers associated with aggressive and sometimes deadly prostate cancers could help men decide how to best manage their disease.

San Antonio.- A study shows a urine test might effectively predict high-risk prostate cancer among men who choose ‘watchful waiting.’ Initial results of the multicenter study involving The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio (UTHSCSA) indicate the presence of two urine-based biomarkers associated with aggressive and sometimes deadly prostate cancers could help men decide how to best manage their disease.

By Elizabeth A. Allen
allenea@uthscsa.edu

Researchers hope recently identified biomarkers will lead to the development of a urine test that could complement – or perhaps even replace – prostate biopsy for predicting disease aggressiveness and progression.

Because many prostate cancers are slow growing and never become life threatening, many men with early stage prostate cancer choose active surveillance – delaying treatment while closely monitoring to see whether the cancer progresses.

Earlier this week, principal investigator Daniel Lin, M.D., an associate member of the Hutchinson Center’s Public Health Sciences Division, presented the findings at the 2012 Genitourinary Cancers Symposium in San Francisco.

“Prostate biopsies are invasive and don’t always pick up all of the cancer. If a urine-based diagnostic test could be developed that could predict aggressive disease or disease progression as well as or better than a biopsy, that would be ideal,” Lin said.

He is also an associate professor and chief of urologic oncology at the Urology Dept, at the University of Washington.

The presentation was based on an interim analysis of data collected from 401 men who opted for active surveillance of their cancer. The study compared biomarker performance to clinical data collected at the time of study entry. Ultimately, the study aims to enroll a total of 1,000 men and follow them for at least five years.

“We know that over half of the 240,000 men diagnosed with prostate cancer each year have low risk cancers. Of these 120,000 men, most are treated when perhaps only 5-10 percent need it. When we’re done with this study, the incredible 1,000 men in this study may help us avoid treatment for over 100,000 men each year in the US,” Dr. Ian M. Thompson Jr., director of the Cancer Therapy and Research Center at UTHSCSA and co-principal investigator of the study, said.

The two urine-based biomarkers were found to correlate with indicators of aggressive disease: tumor volume (the number of biopsy samples that contain cancer) and Gleason score (predicting the aggressiveness of cancer by how it looks under a microscope).
Markers that accurately mirrored these correlates of disease aggressiveness were:
PCA3 – a non-coding RNA that is only found in prostate tissue and has better sensitivity and specificity than PSA in predicting the presence of prostate cancer; and TMRPSS2-ERG
– the fusion of TMRPSS2, a gene that regulates androgen production, with ERG, an oncogene found in about half of all prostate cancers.

Such genetic rearrangements are thought to play a role in the development of the majority of prostate cancers.

Lin leads a nationwide consortium of eight institutions called the Canary Prostate Active Surveillance Study, an endeavor dedicated to identifying and validating biomarkers of high-risk prostate cancer.

Photo: Daniel Lin, M.D., an associate member of the Hutchinson Center’s Public Health Sciences Division.(courtesy photo)

The Canary Foundation and the Early Detection Research Network (EDRN) of the National Cancer Institute funded the study, and the Hutchinson Center’s Public Health Sciences Division provided the biomarker analysis.The research was conducted in medical centers and universities across North America.

  • Ningún comentario presente
Normas de comentarios

www.laprensasa.com no se hace responsable de las ideas expresadas por los autores de los comentarios y se reserva el derecho a eliminar aquellos contenidos que:
  • resulten ofensivos y/o discriminatorios
  • que tengan como fin promover el boicot contra personas, productos empresas o instituciones
  • que atenten contra el derecho a la intimidad, al honor y/o a la propia imagen o nombre
  • aquellos que busquen fines comerciales y/o publicitarios
500 caracteres disponibles
Para evitar spam, por favor resuelva este simple problema matematico e ingrese el resultado (pinche en la imagen para recargarla).

Health / Salud